May 1, 2014

littlemisspaintbrush:

I didn’t want to spam you so I compiled my “10 things to do in Japan” illustrations for Japan Lover Me (website | facebook) in one post! (*≧▽≦)

The lists were researched and listed by Kaila, Kaye, Ashley, and Carly! ♥

*I’ll edit this post when we add more lists! :3

*We’re also going to release a JapanLovin’ Traveller’s e-book soon! :3

[ Sticky: Again, sorry for the lack of posts lately. ;3; April turned out to be the busiest month for me this year.. yet. @A@ (Commissions are still closed, by the way! (except those who reserved long ago) I’ll update you guys soon~ ;-;) ]

(via chokyuhyunsweibo)

September 26, 2013

ohmyasian:

reckon:

'ark nova', the world’s first inflatable concert hall, will soon tour areas of japan that were devastated in the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

designed by british sculptor anish kapoor and japanese architect arata isozaki, the mobile structure will host world-class concerts, workshops, and both traditional and contemporary performance as part of the lucerne festival ark nova. the balloon-like architecture is stationed in matsushima city, which is still healing after being struck by the natural disaster, and the team behind its creation hopes to deliver encouragement and positivity in the form of music. the temporary structure holds about 500 people, whose luminescent purple walls create a billowing interior fitted with handcrafted benches and a stage.

More at designboom

2844. “Ark Nova.” The world’s first inflatable concert hall debuts in Japan!

April 10, 2012
did-you-kno:


Source

Ummm I want a house with slides, too. *U*

did-you-kno:

Source

Ummm I want a house with slides, too. *U*

(via did-you-kno)

November 13, 2011

November 9, 2011
discolor:

Neon Night (by memories of time)

discolor:

Neon Night (by memories of time)

(via discolor)

8:57pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZpaROyBjw4X7
  
Filed under: Japan 
September 1, 2011
toptumbles:

This is called humanity

toptumbles:

This is called humanity

(via toptumbles)

August 29, 2011
weirdasscrap:


Long before the invention of agriculture or the domestication of  animals, the Japanese already lived on villages and cooked their meals  on pots. Ten thousand years before the Christian Era, possibly even  earlier, the inhabitants of the eastern islands had already developed  the art of ceramics, which would arise on the “Cradle of Civilization”,  western Asia, three thousand years later. Reason for the Japanese to  yell “Banzai!“, which actually means “ten thousand years”. Such ancient  ceramics mark the so-called Jomon Jidai, a term from Japanese  archeology: Jomon, meaning “rope pattern”, and Jidai meaning period or  era. The word Jidai would become famousworldwide on a variation created  by filmmaker George Lucas. With his space knights with strict  honor codes, Lucas was inspired by the “jidai geki”, Japanese period  dramas with samurais. That’s where the Jedi knights come from. Our  interest here is something that likewise links Japanese prehistory with  the modern space fantasy. Beside pots, the Jomon Jidai ceramic artifacts  include some figures, called Dogu. With an intriguing appearance,  highly stylized, some of them were recently understood as “six thousand  years-old space suits”, proof of ancient contacts with  extraterrestrials. The idea of ancient astronauts antedates its most  famous promoter, Erich von Däniken, in decades. And we can locate the  association between the Japanese Dogu figures and“space suits” as early  as an article by Russian scientist Viatcheslaw Zaitsev published on the  soviet magazine Spoutnik in June 1967. This article was also the origin  of the Fergana astronaut hoax — which was not Zaitsev’s fault — and also  played a big role in the popularization of the legend of the Dropas.  Curiously, though, real space suits were never exactly like Dogu  figures.Granted, there’s a general resemblance, but made from flexible  parts, like a clothe with many layers, real astronaut suits are not like  the seemingly rigid round shapes that can be seen in the clay figures.  The space suits we know have something very familiar: creases. More  curious still is the fact that future space suits may become very  similar to the thousands-years oldclay. …

Posted by Weird stuff!

Whoa. All hail the Japanese?

weirdasscrap:

Long before the invention of agriculture or the domestication of animals, the Japanese already lived on villages and cooked their meals on pots. Ten thousand years before the Christian Era, possibly even earlier, the inhabitants of the eastern islands had already developed the art of ceramics, which would arise on the “Cradle of Civilization”, western Asia, three thousand years later. Reason for the Japanese to yell “Banzai!“, which actually means “ten thousand years”. Such ancient ceramics mark the so-called Jomon Jidai, a term from Japanese archeology: Jomon, meaning “rope pattern”, and Jidai meaning period or era. The word Jidai would become famousworldwide on a variation created by filmmaker George Lucas.

With his space knights with strict honor codes, Lucas was inspired by the “jidai geki”, Japanese period dramas with samurais. That’s where the Jedi knights come from. Our interest here is something that likewise links Japanese prehistory with the modern space fantasy. Beside pots, the Jomon Jidai ceramic artifacts include some figures, called Dogu. With an intriguing appearance, highly stylized, some of them were recently understood as “six thousand years-old space suits”, proof of ancient contacts with extraterrestrials. The idea of ancient astronauts antedates its most famous promoter, Erich von Däniken, in decades. And we can locate the association between the Japanese Dogu figures and“space suits” as early as an article by Russian scientist Viatcheslaw Zaitsev published on the soviet magazine Spoutnik in June 1967. This article was also the origin of the Fergana astronaut hoax — which was not Zaitsev’s fault — and also played a big role in the popularization of the legend of the Dropas. Curiously, though, real space suits were never exactly like Dogu figures.Granted, there’s a general resemblance, but made from flexible parts, like a clothe with many layers, real astronaut suits are not like the seemingly rigid round shapes that can be seen in the clay figures. The space suits we know have something very familiar: creases. More curious still is the fact that future space suits may become very similar to the thousands-years oldclay. …

Posted by Weird stuff!

Whoa. All hail the Japanese?

(via )

11:52pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZpaROy8wjJEk
  
Filed under: whoa history Japan 
June 15, 2011
chimeramusic:

Please  note this picture of gaping chasms in a Japanese road demonstrated the power  of the March 11, 2011 earthquake. 
Now,  the astonishing speed of reconstruction highlights Japan’s  ability to get back on its feet. 
Work  began on March 17 and six days later, the cratered section of the Great Kanto  Highway in Naka was as good as  new. 
It  was totally ready to re-open to traffic!
10  things to learn from Japan:
1.  THE CALM.  Not  a single visual of chest-beating or wild grief. Sorrow itself has been  elevated.
2.  THE DIGNITY.  Disciplined  queues for water and groceries.  Not a rough word or a crude  gesture. 
3.  THE ABILITY.  The  incredible architects, for instance.  Buildings swayed but didn’t  fall. 
4.  THE GRACE.  People  bought only what they needed for the present, so everybody could get  something. 
5.  THE ORDER. No  looting in shops. No honking and no overtaking on the roads:   Just  understanding. 
6.  THE SACRIFICE.  Fifty workers stayed back to pump sea water in the  N-reactors. How will they ever be repaid? 
7.  THE TENDERNESS.  Restaurants  cut prices. An unguarded ATM was left alone. The strong cared for the  weak.
8.  THE TRAINING.  The  old and the children, everyone knew exactly what to do. And they did just  that. 
9.  THE MEDIA.  They  showed magnificent restraint in the bulletins. No silly reporters. Only calm  reportage. 
10.  THE CONSCIENCE.  When  the power went off in a store, people put things back on the shelves and  left  quietly.

chimeramusic:

Please  note this picture of gaping chasms in a Japanese road demonstrated the power  of the March 11, 2011 earthquake. 

Now,  the astonishing speed of reconstruction highlights Japan’s  ability to get back on its feet. 

Work  began on March 17 and six days later, the cratered section of the Great Kanto  Highway in Naka was as good as  new. 

It  was totally ready to re-open to traffic!

10  things to learn from Japan:

1.  THE CALM.  Not  a single visual of chest-beating or wild grief. Sorrow itself has been  elevated.

2.  THE DIGNITY.  Disciplined  queues for water and groceries.  Not a rough word or a crude  gesture. 

3.  THE ABILITY.  The  incredible architects, for instance.  Buildings swayed but didn’t  fall. 

4.  THE GRACE.  People  bought only what they needed for the present, so everybody could get  something. 

5.  THE ORDER. No  looting in shops. No honking and no overtaking on the roads:   Just  understanding. 

6.  THE SACRIFICE.  Fifty workers stayed back to pump sea water in the  N-reactors. How will they ever be repaid? 

7.  THE TENDERNESS.  Restaurants  cut prices. An unguarded ATM was left alone. The strong cared for the  weak.

8.  THE TRAINING.  The  old and the children, everyone knew exactly what to do. And they did just  that. 

9.  THE MEDIA.  They  showed magnificent restraint in the bulletins. No silly reporters. Only calm  reportage. 

10.  THE CONSCIENCE.  When  the power went off in a store, people put things back on the shelves and  left  quietly.

April 22, 2011
Op-Ed: Psychiatric Disorder Could Complicate Japan Quake Recovery

migidc:

A growing psychiatric phenomenon in Japan known as hikikomori could be especially troublesome in the aftermath of the country’s massive earthquake and tsunami.

1:13pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZpaROy4WT-1i
  
Filed under: Japan hikkimori psychiatry 
November 6, 2010
30-Day Challenge!: Day 07

Day 07- A picture of someone/something that has the biggest impact on you

via imepicture

I’m going there.

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